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Show Me What Yer Made Of, Hoss…

Sometimes- when looking for data that is pertinent to you and you alone, it feels like a showdown at the OK Corral. Can you put all of your records in one query? Will you win? What are you made of, partner?

  • BANG!  Show me the work I am scheduled to perform
  • BANG!  Show me the work orders I must review and sign
  • BANG! BANG!  Show me the assets I must monitor

We all want to find data quickly and easily. Hoorah! Well, because you should be the star of every showdown (BLING BLING), we have a macro for that: @DISPLAYNAME.

The @DISPLAYNAME macro pulls records by comparing the Display Name of the currently logged on user, to the Display Names in a designated field. You can use it with any field that lists personnel records. It pulls only those records listing the same display name as the currently logged on user. The result is that Wild Bob only sees records listing Wild Bob, and you only see records listing  you.

  • BANG!  Show me all the work I, the Scheduled Person, am to perform (an Asset Schedules query):

Record Type:

Asset Schedules

 

 

Field:

Scheduled Person

 

 

Value Type:

Macro

 

 

Function:

Equal To

 

 

Value:

@DISPLAYNAME

 

 

  • BANG!  Show me the work orders I, the Supervisor, must review and sign (an All Work query):

Record Type:

All Work

 

 

Field:

Supervisor

 

 

Value Type:

Macro

 

 

Function:

Equal To

 

 

Value:

@DISPLAYNAME

 

 

  • BANG! BANG!  Show me the assets I, the Owner,  must monitor (an All Assets query):

Record Type:

All Assets

 

 

Field:

Owner

 

 

Value Type:

Macro

 

 

Function:

Equal To

 

 

Value:

@DISPLAYNAME

 

 

I have presented criteria statements utilizing the @DISPLAYNAME macro. Your queries will have additional criteria to further pinpoint exactly which records you want. Remember that if you share queries that use the @DISPLAYNAME macro, each cowpoke –I mean user- only sees those records that list his/her display name. Full instructions for working with Query Designer may be found in the Blue Mountain RAM User Manual.

Well, Part One of Building Queries In Blue Mountain RAM was dining at the Database Bistro, and Part Two was finding a date, and we have finished with a show! Dinner, Date, and a Show! Thank you for a great time and do please show off your mad new query skills!

THE QUERY DESIGN FEATURE OF BLUE MOUNTAIN RAM IS ACCESSIBLE BY: logging into Blue Mountain RAM, opening the “Go To” menu, and selecting “Query Design”. Query designs are organized by the record type of the records they return. For example, to find query designs that return lists of maintenance work records, look under Work, Maintenance Work Queries. The “Add Similar” command is available in the right-click menu of existing designs. This saves time when a new title expands or contracts upon an existing title. Users must be granted query building and sharing rights by their Blue Mountain RAM Administrator. Rights are granted on a record type by record type basis so that user access to data can be finely controlled.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES FOR BLUE MOUNTAIN RAM QUERY DESIGNERS:

  • Blue Mountain RAM User Manual